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I have always been very interested in dialysis and I know that it helps so many people everyday; one of my loved ones for one. My question that I have always wondered is:

1. How many people survive and do not need dialysis every year?
2. Have there been any advances in treatments for dialysis?
 
Posts: 13 | Registered: 26 October 2013Report This Post
<Guest>
posted
1) Don't have specific numbers on ranges, but there are a few people that regain kidney functionality. Just have to be compliant with your doctors orders and take care of yourself. This is the best possible scenario, but a transplant is probably the most realistic and most likely way to no longer need dialysis.

There are people that get a transplant and live a relatively (still need to take a bunch of meds) normal life. There are so many factors that determine if someone gets a transplant (compliance with doctors orders, compatibility with donors, age, other medical conditions), so it's hard to say if a specific person will make it.

I'm not a patient (just a technician), but from what I've seen, the people that have the best chance of survival are the ones that have a good level of trust with their doctors, nurses, and clinic staff. If a patient doesn't trust their doctor, they should try to find one that they do trust. It's almost impossible to get a transplant if a patient is constantly non-compliant with medical advice. Non-compliant behavior such as constantly missing or shortening treatments, not taking medications, improper dieting, etc does get documented. The transplant committee does check on these documents too to see if a patient is responsible enough to receive a transplant.

If I had to estimate, I would probably break it down this way: If I'm in a clinic with 24 patients, maybe only half of them are eligible for a transplant. Of those 12 eligible, maybe only 1 or 2 will manage to get a transplant this year.

2) There are always advances in the dialysis process. It's much easier than it used to be. High flux dialyzers have helped to shorten the treatment lengths. EPO meds have reduced the need for constant blood transfusions. Transonic and BVM technology help to monitor the effectiveness of the treatments.

As far as advancements to move beyond dialysis go though, there is definitely a lag.
 
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<RN>
posted
Patients with stage 5 kidney failure will not regain function by following doctors orders. If someone is on dialysis due to kidney damage, or for fluid removal only, then they may be able to recover and stop dialysis by following dialysis and medication orders.

The transplant system recently changed, and people are now ranked (time on dialysis, age, disease processes) rather than who has been on dialysis the longest. The transplant team will consider if the patient is compliant in receiving dialysis and medications before placing a kidney.

Treatment time matters, and while high flux dialyzers do clean more blood in a shorter period of time, studies show that longer more frequent dialysis is more comparable to a kidney transplant.
 
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<Haydn>
posted
This is all so interesting and good information to look into. Kidney transplants do have a good survival rate in patients. I think there is research being done on other treatment ways that could affect the future on how they do dialysis. A few questions that I would like to ask are the following:
1. Are there any new researched treatments that would help people with kidney disease?
2. Would new research ever entail stem cells or perhaps another animals skin that would help the kidney function?
 
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<RN>
posted
I'm not aware of any new treatments. But they are working on a wearable dialyzer, which I believe is in trials now. And of course they are working on "growing" a new kidney. I believe they have been able to create one, they just have to figure out how to make everything work, no telling how long that will be, but hopefully it will happen soon!
 
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<Haydn>
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Thank you for responding to my question. Thank you also for the information on the wearable dialyzer and the growing of the kidney. I am curious about the growing of the new kidney. My questions would be:
1. What type of material is being grown for that kidney?
2. Where are they growing the kidney?
 
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<RN>
posted
Haydn, I'm not really familiar with the process, and have just read about the kidney here and there. Do a web search for it, I'm sure it will turn up several results.
 
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<Haydn>
posted
Thank you so very much everyone for trying to answer my questions about the kidney and the making of new kidneys. I really appreciate all of your answers. I am very interested in this aspect. I am so thankful to have known some new information about growing a kidney through the tissues. I believe that in the future, the kidney will be grown and made by combining and growing different types of tissues from the animals. My question would be:

What type of tissues do most people use in order to grow the kidney?
 
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I am very curious about the survival rate for patients with kidney issues and dialysis because I know someone who has been on dialysis for quite sometime and he is a survivor. He is now in his 30's.
 
Posts: 13 | Registered: 26 October 2013Report This Post
<Haydn>
posted
I wanted to ask these questions:

1. Is there a correlation between the early diagnosis and detection and survival rate?

2. Have the rates decreased over the years in the diagnosis of kidney dialysis?
 
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<Haydn>
posted
I understand that more and more people are surviving dialysis and kidney transplants, but what is the survival rate for people who live with out any kidney's. Do they need dialysis as well?
 
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