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<interesting>
posted
Straight from the front page. I used to think I made a difference.


Over the last four decades, I have seen these changing 'group norms' in the U.S. nephrology community. (There have always been individual exceptions to these norms.) Since 1975, U.S. nephrologists have:

gone from leading the world in dialysis care and trying to do right by their patients
to abandoning patient employment and rehabilitation (and any associated major technology advances)
to ignoring patients' psychosocial needs
to maximizing profit per treatment by providing the fastest, cheapest, and often harmful treatments (which kept Medicare reimbursement rates stagnant)
to overprescribing profit-making medications
to falling behind other first-world countries in dialysis care outcomes
to extracting billions of dollars of value from the healthcare system through clinic sales to for-profit corporations
to aligning their financial interests with corporate financial interests and never taking opposing policy stances (e.g. Renal Care Partners)
to giving up nearly all their powers as patient advocates by becoming employees of these corporations
to blindly following medication regimens established by these corporations that maximize profits
to accepting widespread corporate cheating in government-required, quality-of-care data
and finally — IMO — despite public trust and their Hippocratic oath, to becoming essentially impotent, ineffective, incompetent, insincere, insular-thinking and specious patient advocates with no professional or political will to change their perverse roles in today's healthcare system
 
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<slick>
posted
someone is cranky!
 
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<Biomed3094>
posted
Geez, tell us how you really feel Eeker
 
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<Guest>
posted
YUUUUUP! Nothing to see here people move along. At most you have a job.
 
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<biomedtech>
posted
You do make a difference. You provide Sustenance, shelter and a higher quality life for your family, through your employment.
You provide dialysis patients with the best AVAILABLE treatment options with well maintained Dialysis equipment and physical environment.
You make a difference by setting an example for YOUR children that by working hard and always trying to do your best that their lives are improved and that when they become adults that they can/will do the same for their families.
Smile and keep doing what you are doing,
YOU DO MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
 
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<interesting>
posted
It's not my thoughts
This was a news article on renal webs headline news
 
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<Jim Jones>
posted
Please, take a cup of that Koolaid right there
 
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<OPINE>
posted
those are the opinions of the editor, not part of the article.....and while the statements do have a basis in truth, I've been doing this tooo long to paint everything with such a wide brush.....dialysis is SAFER now than it's ever been...in the areas where I have worked the patient demographics, education levels, comorbid conditions, age and attitude etc. have directly contributed to the dialysis pts willingness to maintain or get employment. the system I work in ENCOURAGES IT but most can't....this is a for profit business, always has been and will be until some type of social medicine program takes over....sure there have been financial abuses within the system...show me one where there hasn't.....as for quality of care, from my window I think it's pretty good...could always be better....but if the patient does not want to step up and participate there is only so much we can do...no matter what someone or some agency or group thinks
 
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<gp>
posted
The comments that start this thread are taken out of context. Read the whole comment in news column (Aug. 24 or Aug. 25).

The comments are about the Stark Law exemption, that allows nephrologists to own the dialysis facilities to which they refer Medicare patients. The Stark Law exemption completely backfired, as it has richly rewarded nephrologists for practicing bad medicine for decades.

OPINE, remember that this is essentially a taxpayer-funded system. Yes, business people are supposed to be pursing profit. However, in a taxpayer-funded system, physicians are supposed provide a balance by pursuing the patients' best interests. That's what we pay them to do. Instead, the Stark Law exemption brought out the worst in nephrologists, both medically and morally. First they pursued their own financial interests at the expense of patients' well being. Then they aligned themselves with for-profit corporations.

The nephrologists and their business partners have made many decisions over the decades -- based on their profit interests --- that make patient employment almost impossible. Today's employment rate among working-age patients is approximately 10%, according to the USRDS. Nephrologists would never accept standard in-center treatments because they know they could never thrive on such therapy. They know we can do so much better.

Dialysis may be safer, but real progress is based on medical technology breakthroughs. In terms of technology, this field of medicine has been stagnant for over three decades. Why? Nephrologists think like Southwest Airlines. It's cheapest to have only one type of plane and have everybody fly coach and short routes.

Wake up people. The system no longer responds to patients' needs. Virtually all of the power now belongs to the corporations now. They have the nephrologists in their back pockets. Patient groups and non-profit groups must rely on corporate donations/programs to exist. Only corporations can successfully lobby (through campaign contributions) to pass legislation in today's do-nothing Congress. They use their legal might to control policy formation.

Who are the patients' advocates now?
 
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<Whistleblower>
posted
Since 1975, hasn't everything become money driven? That was the infancy of dialysis and transplantation. This industry is the same as everything else now-a-days. How can we screw someone over to line our pockets? I am fortunate to be in an area that the doctors actually review their patients and prescribe what's necessary and not more profitable. I do see it now and then, the God syndrome, look what I do, I did this, I help all these people, write an article about me, take my picture, there's always one A$$hole
 
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Donald Trump will fix it.


These opinions are my own and not of my employer.
 
Posts: 708 | Location: Buffalo, NY | Registered: 14 April 2012Report This Post
<KT>
posted
How could Trump possibly trump Thiry?
 
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<Pickles>
posted
Theory?
 
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<slick>
posted
quote:
Originally posted by Whistleblower:
Since 1975, hasn't everything become money driven? That was the infancy of dialysis and transplantation. This industry is the same as everything else now-a-days. How can we screw someone over to line our pockets? I am fortunate to be in an area that the doctors actually review their patients and prescribe what's necessary and not more profitable. I do see it now and then, the God syndrome, look what I do, I did this, I help all these people, write an article about me, take my picture, there's always one A$$hole


Agreed!
 
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<Luigi>
posted
Trump trumps Thiry because Trump has more money than Thiry. Not much, but more
 
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