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Fresenius Baby K's vs. Nextstage
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<Shane>
posted
Can we discuss these two machines and the pros and cons of each - for instance ease of set up, use, RO's etc. My program offers Baby K's only.
Thanks!
 
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<dguy>
posted
Baby K- pros, are daily treatments 3-4 hr.
Cons are many..plumbing ,elec,space needs,noisy
A patients house may extensive work to accomodate it.
NXstage -pros,minimal needs. one elec. outlet,one drain,one water source.Easy to install,easy to operate.Also it is a completely portable system,take it anywhere that you have an outlet(you will need dialysate bags as well)
Cons-Not a good fit for chronic fluid abusers,you also may need more frequent treatments.
For your active lifestyle,the Nxstage should be your choice. Tell your provider you want it!
Is this Shane from Mpls?
 
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<Honey>
posted
Remember with NxStage you don't have the option of changing dialyzers as it is all one system. If your patient has a reaction to the dialyzer you can't change it.
 
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<Shane>
posted
Is is true that NxStage uses old dialysate solution - someone told me yesterday that the NxStage "recycles" the dialysate and the patient dialyzes with old dialysate. I have also heard that many people are getting turned off to the NxStage these days and goingback to the Baby K or other Fresenius machines. If they "recycle" dialysate it seems pretty gross to me. Please explain. No I am not a patient; I am a home therapy nurse from Maryland.
 
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<dguy>
posted
Not true, there are two options for dialysate:
1.Using the Pureflow option,the machine will make up to 60L of dialysate for each tx.This would be for stationary use in a patients home.
2.Using the prepared dialysate bags(5L each),the machine can be used anywhere.
 
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<Cartridges>
posted
Honey- Not true about cartridges. Nxstage does have a "special" cartridge that can be used with "any" dialyzer.
 
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<Jerry>
posted
Baby K's have another draw back over NxStage the setup and teardown time and the maintenance of the machine and RO consume a major amount of time. I wouldn't even consider doing daily treatments on a Baby K it's just not worth the time. However, I would do nocturnal on a baby K.

The time spent on setup and tear down are split between the night before and the next morning not all done during the day.
 
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<RenalRN>
posted
I have also read that the NextStage was originally designed for CRRT and not dialysis. Thus the "filtration factor". Also, I heard that NextStage water cannot meet AAMI (American Association of Medcial Instrumentation)standards if you use the pureflow because it must use the patient's incoming water and doesn't have a carbon tank or R/O, and also that clearances unless you do short daily hemodialysis are not that good. Does anyone have a study that references the clearances, URR% and KT/V specifically, for a NextStage patient? It would concern me that the water quality mixing the pureflow isn't purified water, wouldn't that concern you?
 
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<?????>
posted
RenalRN, Why are you making false statements about the pureflow? Do you know nothing about it? Everything you said is false, and YES it does have carbon.
 
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<RenalRN>
posted
Ok so enlighten me. Does the water pass AAMI standard water testing? What about an R/O -that's reverse osmosis machine - that is used to make dialysate? How do you know aluminum, magnesium, flouride levels, etc? The carbon tank takes out the magnesium and calcium. How about everything else in city/well water?
 
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<RenalRN>
posted
Also, with the pureflow, can you check bacteria in water and LALs? OOps, sorry about the above - I meant the carbon takes out chlorine/choramines - how do you check for residual chlorine/chloramines? How can you assure, if you're not using a R/O and checking bacterial levels post, you don't have bacteria in the water that you dialyze with? ??? please educate me if you will...no I don't know much about the pureflow and that's why I'm asking.
 
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<???????>
posted
I don't have much time to go into detail but the pureflow uses mostly what a chronic water system has, just smaller minus RO and plus DI. It has carbons, Deionizatin tanks (which most use as a backup when RO goes down) UV light , Ultrafilter (catches lal and bacteria. This isn't everything but as you can see, it will produce water as good or BETTER then a chronic dialysis center. DI tanks have the potential to produce better water then an RO.
 
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<Coil>
posted
True, DI tanks have a potential for better quality water than an RO, however they also add a large cost, as the tanks need to be replaced and recharged, all of which starts adding serious dollars to each treatment.
 
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<dguy>
posted
I suggest you go to the company website where you can read all of the details,needless to say,it is FDA approved,safe and efficient
http://www.nxstage.com/
 
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<Coil>
posted
True, it certainly seems efficent and safe, however my original point of added expense stands. In fact I would hazard a guess that's it's even more, since in effect you are removing the potential of shopping for a lower priced DI tank of UF filter etc. They can charge as much as they want, since they are the only supplier.
 
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