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<jdbiomed>
posted
How many clinics are using the Medisystems Streamline Bloodlines? Have you had any problems with them? Or do you consider them an improvement worth the extra cost? Thanks.
 
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<Idaho>
posted
We started using them a week ago and everyone seems to like them better. Already seeing less little nuisance alarms. Less saline (for priming), no more transducer protectors, less dialysate. It's still early, but so far so good.
 
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<agreed>
posted
We switched over about a year ago. Our nurses like the lines, and apparantly we save money. The Heparin pump module and blood pump module have to be switched, and level detector recalibrated but that is an easy task. I have heard a rumor the lines are hard on the level detector sensor but have not had any problems as of yet...IMO the lines are a plus!
 
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<ashepherd>
posted
Our clinics began using them in earnest last month. They were adopted because clinical trials yielded immediate, visible improvements in patient outcomes. The staff were reluctant to accept the new Streamline Bloodlines because they are more troublesome to set up, prime and test (the lines are tightly tailored for the machines, and the pressure pods sometimes require additional handling to allow the machine to pass bloodside leak test sequences). The more important aspect of using them is to improve the patient outcomes.
 
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<jdbiomed>
posted
i spoke to the sales rep for my area and he says they are coming out with an acute unit line that is longer in lengthin order to deal with the bedside treatments.
 
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<dialysisnurse57>
posted
Our clinic has been using the lines for over one year....initially they were troublesome, but after re-educating the staff on priming they have definitely become an asset to our program. Fewer alarms, less saline are all a part of it, but it goes even farther. We have worked with Medi-systems on dialysate flow rates and blood flow rates to get optimum results. I can very proudly tell you that my clinic now has some of the best patient outcomes nationally while using less dialysate and smaller dialyzers.
 
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<sfelton>
posted
We have been using the lines for about 6 months. At 1st it was really hard for some of us old-timers to get used to the idea of no arterial drip chamber or transducer protectors & not flipping the dialyzer up after starting treatment. However, we have noted fewer alarms, clotted dialyzers, & higher URRs since we have been using the airless bloodlines. Also, there is much less biohazard waste. We have not decreased our saline use as our prime procedure is based on manufacturer's recommendations. We have not decreased our dialysate flows; that was the decision of the physicians & was based on outcomes. We do not find the set-up any more troublesome than the conventional bloodlines. No problems with machine testing. The pods are easy to work with & rarely require handling. The bloodlines are short, but that is both a plus & a minus; they are manageable in the chronic setting. I have 35 years of dialysis experience with conventional hemodialysis & really like these bloodlines.
 
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<Guest>
posted
Thanks to all for posting this info. We are considering the line and I am fearful that staff (old-timers) are going to make this difficult. Good to hear other's experiences.
 
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<Olddog>
posted
I am confused by one of the observations made by sfelton; "...At 1st it was really hard for some of us old-timers to get used to the idea of.......not flipping the dialyzer up after starting the treatment." Does this mean that you are running the dialyzers venous-end up and, if so, how are you compensating for the dialysate cascade and the loss of contacted surface are on the dialysate side fo the dialyzer?
 
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<HMMMM>
posted
quote:
Originally posted by Idaho:
We started using them a week ago and everyone seems to like them better. Already seeing less little nuisance alarms. Less saline (for priming), no more transducer protectors, less dialysate. It's still early, but so far so good.


Curious...how do you use less dialysate by using different lines?
 
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<Idaho>
posted
Check it out at www.medisystems.com and look for the info on streamlines.
 
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<SUE>
posted
quote:
Originally posted by Olddog:
I am confused by one of the observations made by sfelton; "...At 1st it was really hard for some of us old-timers to get used to the idea of.......not flipping the dialyzer up after starting the treatment." Does this mean that you are running the dialyzers venous-end up and, if so, how are you compensating for the dialysate cascade and the loss of contacted surface are on the dialysate side fo the dialyzer?

We don't use this line but started running treatments blue end up and improved outcomes related to air. The dialysate compartment is filled as usual, blue end down and once completely filled, placed in holder red end down for treatment. Flow dynamics are the same but what we see is no air pockets in the header that lead to lost fibers with clot and no air pocket on the arterial end of dialysate compartment resulting in better contact fiber to dialysate. Try it and you will see.
 
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<Olddog>
posted
Sue - Thanks for the detail
 
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<sfelton>
posted
In response to Olddog who stated: "Does this mean that you are running the dialyzers venous-end up and, if so, how are you compensating for the dialysate cascade and the loss of contacted surface are on the dialysate side fo the dialyzer?"
Yes, that's exactly what I mean...and, for the same reasons you mentioned, I really had a hard time with it. In addition to what Sue posted, which was 100% correct, the Streamline bloodlines are much shorter in length...they are not long enough to invert the dialyzer. I wouldn't have believed it, but our outcomes are much better.
 
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<Robb>
posted
We have been using the streamlines for about 6 monthes and at first everyone thought that they were great. About a month ago , our machines began failing blood side pressure tests. We found that it was due to the arterial pod membrane sticking to the one side of the pod. I called our bloodline supplier and made a formal complaint and in the meantime, we would inject about .75 cc of air into the pod to remove it from the wrong side. Now i'm hearing that medisystems is following up on the issue and I hope to hear the findings soon because they have stopped shipment on the streamlines to our clinic at least.
 
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